Mind and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Sharing: Essays in Honour of Amita Chatterjee (2 Vols-Set)

  • Title : Mind and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Sharing: Essays in Honour of Amita Chatterjee (2 Vols-Set)
  • Author : Edited by Kuntala Bhattacharya, Madhucchanda Sen and Smita Sirker
  • ISBN 13 : 9788124609507
  • Year : 2019
  • MRP : Rs 4000
  • Selling Price : Rs 3320
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Contents: Preface. Volume I: My Philosophical Journey/Amita Chatterjee. Part 1 : Fusion Philosophy: 1. Local Norms : The Priority of the Particular/Jonardon Ganeri. 2. Sowing the Seeds of Physical and Moral Consequences : Causal Attribution and Moral Responsibility/Smita Sirker. 3. Vyapti and Necessity/Sundar Sarukkai. 4. Simulation and Meditation/Maushumi Guha. 5. Ashtanga Yoga in Synergy with Medical Science/Uma Dhar. Part 2 : Mind and Cognition: 6. The Qualitative and the Intentional Contents of Consciousness/Manidipa Sen. 7. On Being No One : The Idea of a Perspective less Self/Bijoy H. Boruah. 8. I Do Therefore I Am : What Agentive Self-awareness Teaches Us about the Unity of Consciousness/Nivedita Gangopadhyay. 9. Aspects, Insights and Creativity/Anirban Mukherjee. 10. Mental Image and Its Relevance in the Human Cognitive System/Lopamudra Choudhury.11. Control of Emotional State-transitions by Audio-Visual Stimulus Using Fuzzy Automata/Aruna Chakraborty, Anisha Halder and Amit Konar. Part 3 : Mind and Perception. 12. Dinnaga’s Definition of Perception : A Review/Kuntala Bhattacharya.13. Perception of Sensible Qualities : A Problem for the Nyaya Epistemologists/Srilekha Datta.14. The Problem of Perception and the Common Element Thesis : A Critique/Madhucchanda Sen. 15. In Search of a Genuine Smell Illusion : Olfactory Phenomenology and the Representational Theory of Perception/Nalini Bhushan. Part 4 : Mind and Language.16. Thinking with Words : In Search of a Global Theory of the Mind–Language Interface/R.C. Pradhan.17. Things Wrong with Perry’s Account of Attitudes De Se/Arthur Falk.18. Silent Words: Semiotic Assemblages as Bridges to the Semantics–Pragmatics Divide in Communication/Rolla Das, Rajesh Kasturirangan and Anindya Sinha.19. Conversations and Other Illocutionary Act Successions/Probal Dasgupta. Volume II: Part 5 : Logic and Vagueness. 20. Vagueness: A Case for Degrees of Truth/Sanjukta Basu. 21. Making Sense of Vagueness as a Fuzzy Idea/Prajit Basu. 22. Soft Truth, Soft Consequence and Soft Computing/Mihir Kumar Chakraborty and Zhao Chuan. 23. Where Vagueness Is a Virtue/Shefali Moitra. 24. Vagueness and God/Nirmalya Narayan Chakraborty. Part 6 : Logic. 25. Salmon’s Guise or Fregean Sinn?/Shyamasree Bhattacharya. 26. A Transcendental Argument for Essentialism/Indrani Sanyal. Part 7 : Indian Philosophy. 27. Some Musings on Dharma as Moral Value in Indian Philosophy/Tara Chatterjea. 28. Dinnaga’s Reflexivity Thesis/Mark Siderits. 29. Svaprakashatva Character of Cognition after Bhartrihari/Madhumita Chattopadhyay. 30. Doctrine of Epistemic Perspectives (Nayavada): A Critical Re-Assessment/Tushar Kanti Sarkar. 31. Is Tense Real? A Nyaya–Buddhist Controversy/Maitreyee Datta. 32. On Definition/Ratna Dutta Sharma. Part 8: Philosophy, Society and Popular Culture. 33. Philosophy and Hindi Cinema: Not a Theory of Hindi Cinema/Sharad Deshpande. 34. Why Do We Practise Vrata? Looking at the Issue from Feminist Point of View/Sebanti Bhattacharya. Responses/Amita Chatterjee. A Bibliography of Writings of Amita Chatterjee. Index. “Knowing one’s tradition is important; but only when tradition is not presented as fossilised but as continuous with our present-day living. In most places we do not make enough effort to show the link between the classical philosophical thoughts and the contemporary world view. We need to show that we can still meaningfully interact with the classical philosophical systems”, writes Amita Chatterjee in her seminal essay “In Search of Counterpoints”. This volume is dedicated in her honour. “Knowing one’s tradition is important; but only when tradition is not presented as fossilised but as continuous with our present-day living. In most places we do not make enough effort to show the link between the classical philosophical thoughts and the contemporary world view. We need to show that we can still meaningfully interact with the classical philosophical systems”, writes Amita Chatterjee in her seminal essay “In Search of Counterpoints”. This volume is dedicated in her honour. Chatterjee belongs to a genre of philosophers, who have as part of their cultural heritage, like Raghunath Siromani and Immanuel Kant. Chatterjee, in addition to breaking cultural boundaries, desired to break boundaries that have kept professional disciplines apart. She deeply believes that there are certain basic questions that are questions not for any specific discipline. These questions, she thinks, could not be answered by remaining within one single discipline. It is no surprise that she was the founder of the first Cognitive Science Centre in India. Responding to her multifaceted academic talent, forty academics from diverse disciplines and from all over the world have contributed papers to this volume. Chatterjee’s intellectual autobiography and her responses to each of the papers are parts of this volume