Labour Laws and Governance Reforms in the Post-Reform Period in India: Missing the Middle Ground? Essays in Honour of Prof K P Chellaswamy

  • Title : Labour Laws and Governance Reforms in the Post-Reform Period in India: Missing the Middle Ground? Essays in Honour of Prof K P Chellaswamy
  • Author : K R Shyam Sundar and Rahul Suresh Sapkal
  • ISBN 13 : 9789382059882
  • Year : 2020
  • MRP : Rs 1695
  • Selling Price : Rs 1390
  • Discount : 18%
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Description

Ever since the introduction of Economic reforms in 1991 in India employers and critics of labour regulation have argued for the introduction of labour laws and governance reforms. Since 2014, significant labour market reforms have been introduced, both at the federal and the regional levels. Recently, the central government has rationalised the numerous Central labour laws into four Codes, viz. Industrial Relations, Wages, Social Security and Occupational Safety, Health and Working Conditions. The Central government has already enhanced the Wage Code and is keen to enact the remaining Codes. Trade unions have severely criticized the labour market reforms including the Codes. At the same time, recently, there have been debates concerning "jobless growth" in the economy and labour statistics in India. So, labour market issues have hogged the headlines often during the most part of this decade. This book, dedicated to Prof. K.P. Chellaswamy, Professor (Retired), Department of Economics, Guru Nanak College, Madras (now Chennai), provides critical analyses of developments relating to labour market reforms, annual Union Budgets, labour statistics etc. during the post-reform period. It also includes a special analytical chapter on the recently published Periodic Labour Force Survey, 2017-18. The Articles in the book argue that a strong and sustainable institutional framework at all levels in the industrial relations system can be built on five core institutional principles, viz. sustained and effective social dialogue, balance between firm's competitiveness and labour rights, an abiding respect for labour institutions, decent work and employment, and a comprehensive and universal social protection for workers. This, the authors believe, will lead the stakeholders to adopt the currently missing 'middle ground' in their reform efforts.